Introduction to Visualization

Aim: To develop the basic skills commonly known as ‘visualization’.

While the term visualization is not the best name for this skill it is very common. The problem with the term visualization is that the skills do not rely solely on inner visual senses, but rather on all inner senses. While the term visualization is used throughout the exercises (below), it should be kept in mind that what we are referring to is essentially a type of active imagination (a term commonly associated with the work of Carl Jung).

Visualization may be either spontaneous or controlled. With spontaneous visualization there is no intention for what images or symbols may appear to be worked with. With controlled visualization there is some form of intention behind the imagery. This may be another person guiding, or it may be the usage of a symbol to initiate the visualization (such as path-working with Tarot cards or runes).

The exercises presented here are not intended to be performed once and then discarded. They can be performed regularly, for perhaps one or two weeks. They can be used by experienced individuals from time to time to practice the skills. Remember, all advanced visualization builds on basic skills.

Important: Read the entire lesson through slowly and carefully before proceeding with the exercises.

What you will need

  • A pen and paper (preferably a journal) to note down your experiences from performing these exercises and any insights and understandings you develop during your studies on trancework.
  • A quiet space where you will not be disturbed while practicing the exercises.

Exercise 1 – Visualizing Objects

Aim: To assist you in learning basic visualization skills.

Preparation

  • You will need 5 small items and a piece of cloth to cover them. Items should be relatively simple, such as coins, buttons, paperclips, stones, etc.
  • Before beginning, write down any expectations and feelings you have related to this exercise.

Exercise

  • Sit down, with the items you gathered placed under the cloth and within easy reach.
  • Take out 1 object and examine it closely.
  • Place the object back under the cloth.
  • Close your eyes and spend some time recreating the object in your minds eye.
  • Open your eyes and make some notes on what you experienced with this object.
  • Repeat with each of the remaining objects.
  • When you have completed the exercise write about the experience in your journal. Note any difficulties you may have experienced.


Exercise 2 – Visualizing an Object from Memory

Aim: To assist you in learning to visualize objects from memory.

Preparation

  • Before beginning, write down any expectations and feelings you have related to this exercise.

Exercise

  • Sit or lie comfortably.
  • Close your eyes.
  • Take a few deep breaths, exhaling slowly.
  • Allow yourself to feel relaxed.
  • Imagine a piece of fruit of your choosing.
  • See clearly in your minds eye the colour, shape, and texture of the fruit.
  • Open your eyes and make some notes on what you ‘saw’, noting any difficulties or peculiarities.
  • Close you eyes again.
  • Recall the fruit in your minds eye.
  • Touch the fruit, noting its texture and what it ‘feels’ like.
  • Open your eyes and make some notes on what you ‘felt’.
  • Close you eyes again.
  • Recall the fruit in your minds eye.
  • Listen to the fruit, does it make a sound?
  • Open your eyes and make some notes on what you ‘heard’.
  • Close you eyes again.
  • Recall the fruit in your minds eye.
  • Smell the fruit, taking some time to identify any fragrances and what they bring to mind
  • Open your eyes and make some notes on what you ‘smelt’.
  • Close you eyes again.
  • Recall the fruit in your minds eye.
  • Taste the fruit. What does it taste like?
  • Open your eyes and make some notes on what you ‘tasted’.
  • When you have completed the exercise write about the experience in your journal. Note any difficulties you may have experienced.

Suggestion: Try this with other objects.


Exercise 3 – Visualizing Colors

Aim: To practice the visualization of colors.

Preparation

Before beginning, write down any expectations and feelings you have related to this exercise.

Exercise

  • Sit or lie comfortably.
  • Close your eyes.
  • Take a few deep breaths, exhaling slowly.
  • Bring to mind a rainbow, comprised of many colors.
  • Choose 1 of the colors, and allow this color to fill your mind’s eye completely
  • Pay attention for changes in the shade of color.
  • Note any other internal senses that become activated while visualizing the color (sounds, smells, etc)
  • When you have finished, open your eyes again and make some notes on your experience.
  • When you have completed the exercise write about the experience in your journal. Note any difficulties you may have experienced.


Exercise 4 – Visualizing Familiar Symbols

Aim: To practice the visualization of simple symbols you are already familiar with.

Preparation

Before beginning, write down any expectations and feelings you have related to this exercise.

Exercise

  • Choose either the alphabet or number symbols from your native language (i.e. Latin alphabet A through Z)
  • Sit or lie comfortably.
  • Close your eyes.
  • Take a few deep breaths, exhaling slowly.
  • Visualize the first symbol in the sequence. e.g. “A”
  • See it clearly in your minds eye, large and bold.
  • Now, allow it to change into the next symbol in the sequence. e.g. “B”
  • Again, see it clearly in your minds eye, large and bold.
  • Repeat this process for all remaining symbols in the sequence. e.g. “C” … “Z”
  • When you have completed the exercise write about the experience in your journal. Note any difficulties you may have experienced.

Suggestion: Experiment with various other symbols such as the Runic, Hebrew, Greek and Enochian alphabets.


Exercise 5 – Extending Visualization

Aim: To show that you understand the concept of visualization and have the ability to adapt the skills to your own needs and requirements.

Exercise

  • Consider all the previous visualization exercises you have practiced, including any that are from sources other than these lessons.
  • Using the previous exercises, and your experiences with them, as a basis, formulate a new exercise.
  • Write down the aim of the exercise, along with all the steps to be performed.
  • Write down any expectations and feelings you have related to the exercise you have just created.
  • Perform the exercise, following each of the steps you wrote down.
  • Write about the experience in your journal.
  • If you are unhappy with the exercise, review it, rewrite the parts you feel are necessary to change, then perform the exercise again. Repeat this until you have achieved the desired result.

Visualization Notes

The lessons are provided in a very simple form as it is the practice and experimentation that is important. The exercises really are as ‘simple’ as they seem.

Most of these simple exercises can be easily adapted for practice outside of the normal “quiet” environment. They can be practiced during breaks at work, while commuting on the bus or train, or at other times you find convenient to practice.

While I promote practice and experiential learning as the primary method of training, I also encouraged you to read various books and articles on trance and practice additional exercises from other authors, traditions and cultures to get a good working knowledge of the experience of trance.

Free Magic Lessons

Magical Path offers a free introductory magic course. The lessons cover the following topics: Beliefs, The Magic Mirror, Imagination & Will, Inner Work, Higher Self, Synthesis, Magic, and Morality. Click here to apply.

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